SOCIAL MEDIA IMAGE DISCUSS USE WITH YOUR EDITOR – SOCIAL MEDIA IMAGE DISCUSS USE WITH YOUR EDITOR – DOG DAYS: Fraser Island Dingoes play around in the sand.
SOCIAL MEDIA IMAGE DISCUSS USE WITH YOUR EDITOR – SOCIAL MEDIA IMAGE DISCUSS USE WITH YOUR EDITOR – DOG DAYS: Fraser Island Dingoes play around in the sand.

ANGER: News of dingo feedings met with frustration

THE news that two people have been fined for feeding dingoes on Fraser Island has been met with frustration by Cheryl Bryant from Save the Fraser Island Dingoes.

"People are still not listening even though fines have been increased significantly," she said.

"I don't know what else we can do."

The first fine was issued on December 28, after a member of the public provided rangers with footage of an individual luring and feeding a dingo in the Orchid Beach residential area.

The second fine was issued on January 16 to another individual caught feeding a dingo near the Waddy Point beachfront area.

Each was fined $2135 as a result of their actions.

Ms Bryant said she hoped the fact that two people had received significant fines would act as a deterrent for others contemplating making the same choice.

"They think they won't get caught but eventually they will get caught.

"It's good that people have been caught and fined that amount of money.

"It's not just a slap on the wrist, it's a really significant fine."
The heavier fines were introduced last year, with Minister for Environment and Science Leeanne Enoch saying the fines served as a timely reminder that people needed to be aware of the significant and serious consequences of feeding dingoes.

"The government is committed to supporting a sustainable and healthy dingo population and the increase in fines is intended to act as a significant deterrent to people interacting with dingoes in a way that can lead to their habitualisation," Ms Enoch said.

"There is a zero-tolerance approach and we will use all means at our disposal to hold offenders accountable," she said.

"The fines also serve as a reminder that rangers don't have to be present to charge a person feeding, enticing or interfering with dingoes."

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