Angus Scott-Young wraps up teammate Taniela Tupou during training warm-up at Ballymore. Picture: Stu Walmsley
Angus Scott-Young wraps up teammate Taniela Tupou during training warm-up at Ballymore. Picture: Stu Walmsley

Reds have burning desire to beat Tahs

WHEN short-fused forward Sam Scott-Young set fire to a NSW jersey in 1990 he set the tone on how much interstate bragging rights should mean to Queenslanders.

He wasn't to know that the torch would one day pass to son Angus, 21, to be part of the motivated Reds pack now charged with restoring shredded pride.

Flailing fists like those backrower Scott-Young senior traded with Waratah Michael Brial will have no part in Saturday night's mission at the Sydney Cricket Ground.

Three decades on, some essentials haven't changed like the need for thumping authority from the forwards, no stupid kicking and the strong, plain maroon jersey which has returned.

"Wanting to beat NSW should be in the blood of every Queensland player and you want bragging rights back after nine losses," Scott-Young Sr said.

"I won a man-of-the-match award from my teammates for best fight from one game against NSW.

"Those days are long gone and the worthy awards now are for skill and great plays."

Scott-Young Jr has been raised from the cradle on what these Queensland-NSW games mean and he will be a non-stop factor on Saturday.

Queensland Reds player Angus Scott-Young will be hoping for a good outing against the Waratahs before being invited to Michael Cheika’s first gathering of Wallabies hopefuls.
Queensland Reds player Angus Scott-Young will be hoping for a good outing against the Waratahs before being invited to Michael Cheika’s first gathering of Wallabies hopefuls.

The Reds must also use more of Scott Higginbotham's dynamism in the backrow because the last-start reserve is the only Red who knows what beating NSW looks like.

"Dad always put me in a maroon jersey when I was a youngster and you just needed to turn on the TV to watch a game with him to know his passion for it," Angus said.

"For me, there are a lot family ties to that jersey to be proud of.

"Dad says a lot of things I can't repeat here but he has always highlighted that playing NSW was a grand final for him.

"We lost twice to NSW last year (in Scott-Young's rookie year) and we want to bounce back."

Scott-Young said the improvement within the 2019 Reds wasn't just tagged to playing NSW.

"In the first two games, you could see the team has a bit more fight than last year and there was no falling apart when the Crusaders put on two quick tries (10-0) last weekend," he said.

Scott-Young will be invited to Michael Cheika's first gathering of Wallabies hopefuls on Sunday after the Test coach noted his improvement.

Queensland No. 8 Sam Scott-Young put the torch to a NSW jersey back in 1990.
Queensland No. 8 Sam Scott-Young put the torch to a NSW jersey back in 1990.

"Really good work ethic and tough around the ball," was the Cheika assessment.

And now the full story behind that singed old Waratahs jersey when Queensland were preparing for 1990s return interstate match after a 12-3 win over NSW in Sydney.

"Without thinking, I raced out of home in a blue NSW jersey, I'd swapped for with Tim Gavin, to head to Ballymore training," Scott-Young said.

"(Coach) John Connolly hated NSW as much as I did and he ordered me to wear a tracksuit over the top of it for the full session in 35C heat.

"That'll teach you', he said so I burned it before the return interstate match for a newspaper photo."

 

The Queensland women's team will be without prop Liz Patu, banned for six weeks for biting, in Sunday's clash against NSW at Sydney's Leichhardt Oval.

Scott-Young Jr only passed comment when pressed.

"Obviously, in this game there is no room for that sort of behaviour. She's showed remorse and it's been handled," Angus said.

Playing against former Red Karmichael Hunt, a likely starter in the centres, will be an intriguing subplot.

"He's a really good player and I'm sure he'll go well in the sky blue jersey but we're just treating him as another threat in the Waratahs," Angus said.