Award-winning house designer Chris Clout. Picture: Pete Johnson.
Award-winning house designer Chris Clout. Picture: Pete Johnson.

Award-winning house designer accused of posing as architect

AN award-winning Queensland house designer has been taken to court by the Queensland Board of Architects for posing as an architect.

Christopher Peter Clout, 34, of Castaways Beach just south of Noosa, could be fined after being accused of misusing the title ''architect'' by allowing himself to be held out as one.

His Marcoola-based company, Chris Clout Design Pty Ltd, which specialises in modern, luxurious tropical-style houses, has been charged with holding out a person as an architect, an offence under the state's Architects Act.

One of Chris Clout’s high-end constructions.
One of Chris Clout’s high-end constructions.

The complaint dated June 5 was made by Bruce Raymond Medek, the chair of the Queensland Board of Architects, and was filed in the Brisbane Magistrates Court.

Mr Medek alleges that "on various dates between June 7 last year and February 28 this year" Chris Clout Design held out Mr Clout as an architect, knowing that he was not one.

Mr Medek alleged Clout provided "building design services", and that none of Clout's staff was an architect either.

The complaint alleged Clout's website offered "services which included architecture, by repeated use of the words architecture and architectural" and also in a book titled "Resort Houses - a collection of Chris Clout's best designs", by author Emma Peacock, which allegedly represented Clout as "someone who offered services which included architecture".

Bruce Medek, chair of the Queensland Board of Architects.
Bruce Medek, chair of the Queensland Board of Architects.

The court was told that the prosecution brief ran to more than 700 pages. The case will return to court for a two-day trial on November 5 and 6, the court file stated.

Clout's website stated he had won multiple Building Designers' Association of Queensland awards for the design of modern houses.

Some homes were worth more than $3 million.