Bag ban a 'small drop in the ocean'

13th September 2017 8:00 AM
Diane Christensen with the bags which can be used to carry fruit and vegetables as an alternative to plastic bags at a grocery store. Diane Christensen with the bags which can be used to carry fruit and vegetables as an alternative to plastic bags at a grocery store. Inge Hansen

FOR Diane Christensen, the decision to ban plastic bags in Queensland is just a "small drop in the ocean".

"I knew it was coming but we still have such a far way to go," Ms Christensen said.

State Parliament recently passed new laws to ban plastic bags across the state as of July 1, 2018.

As a member of the Wildlife Queensland Fraser Coast Branch, Ms Christensen said she hoped the ban would have a roll on effect across Australia and the world.

"People need to change their habits when it comes to disposing of plastics and rubbish," she said.

"When items such as plastic bags aren't thrown away properly it can kill marine life and even pelicans on land if they try to swallow a bag."

As minuscule plastic particles are left in the water, Ms Christensen said humans who eat fish could also consume plastic which has already been digested by the sea life leading to possible illness.

Three years ago Ms Christensen kick started an anti-plastic bag campaign spreading her message through schools and the community.

Since its inception, Ms Christensen has brought to schools an anti-plastic program which gives students a visual representation of what choosing canvas over plastic can actually do for the environment.

"I've lived (in Hervey Bay) practically my whole life so I know exactly how important it Is to manage waste and protect the environment," she said.

"We created bags made of tulle which can be used to carry your potatoes and other fruits and vegetables while you're at the shops instead of those flimsy plastic ones."