Glenn Fallon at Scarness Beach with a poster of the Endeavour.Photo: Alistair Brightman
Glenn Fallon at Scarness Beach with a poster of the Endeavour.Photo: Alistair Brightman Alistair Brightman

Bay's grand evolution to city status

DESPITE growing into a modern city, Hervey Bay has never lost its small town charm.

That is the view of history buff and long term local real estate agent Glenn Fallon of Ray White Hervey Bay.

Mr Fallon spoke to the Chronicle yesterday on the significance of James Cook's running survey of the east coast of Australia.

This week, 250 years ago, Cook recorded the first European sighting of the area.

Exploring the Queensland coast, Cook and his men sailed along the east coast of what we now know as Fraser Island or K'gari.

Glenn Fallon at Scarness Beach.Photo: Alistair Brightman
Glenn Fallon at Scarness Beach.Photo: Alistair Brightman Alistair Brightman

Cook named the body of water between the island and mainland Hervey's Bay around May 22, 1770.

He named the bay after Augustus John Hervey, a British naval officer who became Lord of the Admirality.

"I think it is really important that we acknowledge these events," Mr Fallon said.

Looking back on his own experience of the Bay, Mr Fallon recalled walking on the Urangan pier as a child - witnessing at times up to three vessels docked at the iconic structure.

Sugar from cane grown as far away as Childers and Bundaberg was exported from there.

"I have been in business here for 40 years and have seen the Bay grow," he said.

Its evolution, in Mr Fallon's eyes, has been continuous.

"It never really boomed, but just got bigger and more modern," he said.