M’boro MP blames federal election loss on ‘disliked’ Shorten

STATE member for Maryborough Bruce Saunders has blasted his federal counterparts, saying Labor lost the election because Bill Shorten was an unpopular leader with confusing policies.

"It's got to be said Bill Shorten was disliked," Mr Saunders, who has held the seat since 2015, told the Chronicle.

"No one understood the policies."

His comments came after the Courier-Mail reported the State Government would be "wiped out" if the federal election results were repeated at next year's state poll.

The analysis listed Maryborough as one of the 16 most "at-risk" seats in next year's state election.

The Courier-Mail reported Townsville, Thuringowa, Mundingburra, Keppel, Rockhampton, Maryborough and Mackay "would fall like dominoes down the coastline", taking out Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk's hopes for a third term amid anger about Adani.

The analysis was based on swings and total votes recorded at federal polling booths, and compared to results from Queensland's 2017 election.

Mr Saunders said federal politics had little impact on the State Government, adding that Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk enjoyed much higher levels of popularity in Queensland than Bill Shorten had.

He would not speculate on what might happen in his seat at the next state election, only commenting that he was working as hard as possible to achieve good outcomes for his electorate.

"I've just got to do what I always do and put the Maryborough electorate first at all times," he said.

"I stand on the record of what I have achieved."

Mr Saunders said he had been left baffled by Labor's tactics during the election.

"We had shadow ministers flying in to tell us how to live our lives," he said.

Mr Saunders said regional Queensland had not responded well to the policies or strategies employed by Labor and the Greens during the election campaign.

The anti-Adani convoy led by former Greens leader Bob Brown was one example of a strategy that likely repelled voters, he said.

He said many of Labor's policies had been interpreted as attacks on people who were trying to better their lives.