NOT DOG BONES: Butchulla elder Aunty Mally Clarke with observer Dustyn Currie explaining details of the uncovered bones.
NOT DOG BONES: Butchulla elder Aunty Mally Clarke with observer Dustyn Currie explaining details of the uncovered bones. Alistair Brightman

Butchulla elder speaks on Seafront Oval bones

WHENEVER bones are discovered in prominent Hervey Bay sites, Aunty Mally Clarke is one of the first to check if they belong to her ancestors.

The Butchulla elder spoke to the Chronicle outside the site where bones were discovered by Dustyn Currie on Wednesday night.

The site was formerly a well-known indigenous corroboree ground and cooking site known as The Kitchen, which had deep spiritual significance to the Butchulla tribe.

Ms Clarke claimed her ancestors were not only buried at the site, but all around Hervey Bay.

She said her family used to swim from K'Gari (Fraser Island) to the site to camp and eat there.

"It's sacred land, my family's been here since day one,” Ms Clarke said.

"We used to camp here, they fished here and got turtles and dugongs and all that back in the day.

"They're were buried everywhere (my ancestors), they're everywhere in the Bay.”

Ms Clarke and several Butchulla locals spent yesterday morning combing the site after Mr Currie's discovery.

At first, she said the bones looked "too big for a dog”.

But a Queensland Police Service spokeswoman confirmed yesterday afternoon a forensic analysis had concluded the bones were not those of a human.