TIARO: Owners of Tiaro Christmas Cottage Jenny and Grant Wood. Photo: Stuart Fast
TIARO: Owners of Tiaro Christmas Cottage Jenny and Grant Wood. Photo: Stuart Fast

BYPASS BLUES: Coast business owner fears tough times ahead

A BRUCE HIGHWAY bypass to be built around Tiaro has received a mixed reception from the town's business owners.

Jenny and Grant Wood, owners of the Tiaro Christmas Cottage, said they expected business to be tough when the town was bypassed.

Mrs Wood said the cottage counted on motorists passing through.

Trade also relied on Tiaro's location as the gateway to the Fraser Coast, she said.

She hoped when the bypass was complete, there would be plenty of signage as well as a campaign to attract tourists to the town.

Mrs Wood spoke to the Chronicle after it was announced Works for Queensland funding would go towards preparing the town for a future bypass.

The state and council have jointly collaborated to establish a working group of community members who are helping to develop an action plan for improvements in Tiaro as a result of the bypass project.

The specific project elements will be discussed with this working group but $230,000 will be used for parkland and streetscape upgrades in and around Tiaro's main street.

Elements include, but are not limited to, street furniture in Mayne St, upgrades to the RV parking area and surrounding parklands.

Retro Espresso manager Thor Olsen was optimistic about the benefits of the bypass.

He said the town would be quieter, not having as much traffic or trucks passing through.

TIARO: Busy northbound traffic moves through Tiaro. Photo: Stuart Fast
TIARO: Busy northbound traffic moves through Tiaro. Photo: Stuart Fast

"I think people will still stop in Tiaro," he said.

He said one way the Fraser Coast Regional Council could entice tourists to the town was by having more signage and building more car parking spaces.

Owner of Tiaro Hippie Garage, Corey Prickett said the bypass would have a definite impact.

He said keeping trade strong after the bypass was built would depend on how the town's businesses marketed themselves.

He said one way to market the town was as a tourist rest stop, saying Tiaro had the facilities and space to accommodate travellers.