New research, led by the University of Sydney, concludes the dingo is a member of the dog family in its own right, separate from dogs and wolves.
New research, led by the University of Sydney, concludes the dingo is a member of the dog family in its own right, separate from dogs and wolves.

Classing of dingoes may bring protection

DINGOES may now be classified as a distinctly Australian animal but Fraser Island advocates hope that all this bark comes with some bite.

Malcolm Kilpatrick from Save Fraser Island Dingoes says while the move to classify the animal as a unique Australian species is a step in the right direction, it should work to prompt further action to protect the dingoes on Fraser Island.

"We've been pushing for the past seven years to have the purity of dingoes on Fraser Island acknowledged," he said.

"Previously it was the case that only because they were on a national park ground they were afforded protection and now we're hoping that can be expanded so purebred dingoes will be protected more now that they have been classified as native."

The dingo has been definitively classified as an Australian animal thanks to new research led by the University of Sydney which concludes the dingo is a member of the dog family in its own right, separate from dogs and wolves.

Mr Kilpatrick says that education is a major issue when it comes to keeping dingo populations intact.

"If people release their dogs into the wild it's going to lead to cross breeding," he said.