ENVIRONMENTAL PRIORITY: Councillor David Lewis with Fraser Coast RV Park owner Suzanne Denton and Land for Wildlife officer Skott Statt on Ms Denton's property at River Heads.
ENVIRONMENTAL PRIORITY: Councillor David Lewis with Fraser Coast RV Park owner Suzanne Denton and Land for Wildlife officer Skott Statt on Ms Denton's property at River Heads. Alistair Brightman

Conservation conscious: First Coast land holders to join LFW

FRASER Coast landholders are being encouraged to take part in a free council-run voluntary conservation program.

Land for Wildlife has been re-instated after 11 years, with the appointment of a new support worker thanks to funds held over from Fraser Coast Regional Council's environmental levies.

Councillor David Lewis said the program aimed to assist land owners to manage wildlife habitats on their properties.

"This policy itself isn't going to affect future development in compelling anyone to do it but what we are going to do is encourage people to develop in a way that is consistent to preserve wildlife habitat," he said.

"The LFW program can assist in appropriate circumstances by providing technical advice and so on."

Support officer Skott Statt, a former Vocational Educational Training teacher and Natural Resource Manager, said when the program was running before there were about 120 participants but only 65 still lived at those properties.

River Heads Fraser Coast RV Park owner Suzanne Denton said she was thrilled hers was the first property involved in the new program.

"The nature reserve on our property is 16 hectares of natural beauty with water courses and a billabong, a mob of about 30 kangaroos, more than 40 species of birds and a wide diversity of trees and plants," she said.

"We are excited about the potential nature-based tourism offers to those who want to reconnect with nature in peaceful and tranquil surroundings."

Cr Lewis said the council was committed to supporting the program for at least the next two years.

"It is absolutely fundamental not just because preserving species is valuable itself but it is fundamentally important to the quality of our lives and the value of the region," he said.

"It makes the region a far more attractive place for people to come and live and invest and establish their businesses and grow their families."