Sand pushing to restore beaches and other jobs on the foreshore from Burrum Heads to Poona will have quite a significant cost, the council says.
Sand pushing to restore beaches and other jobs on the foreshore from Burrum Heads to Poona will have quite a significant cost, the council says. contributed

Council to set priorities for 1000 extra repair jobs

THE council is faced with about 1000 extra jobs after ex-tropical cyclone Oswald.

Infrastructure planning and delivery portfolio councillor Trevor McDonald said council workers had finished inspecting the entire region for damage caused by the storm or flooding.

Cr McDonald said the inspections revealed about 700 jobs on damaged roads across the region, and about 300 jobs in parks and along the foreshore from Burrum Heads to Poona.

The council's infrastructure recovery group is now expected to examine the potential cost of each job, before compiling a report for funding approval.

In the meantime, however, Cr McDonald said the group had set some preliminary priorities.

The number one priority was the rural road network across the Fraser Coast.

He said there were about 350 roads that fit in this category, which vitally required repairs so that heavy trucks carrying stock and feed could once again operate safely as soon as possible.

"Some of these small back-roads can carry $1 million worth of cattle a year," Cr McDonald said.

Booubijan Rd, Glenbar Rd and Churchill Mine Rd were three examples of rural roads in dire need of repair, he said.

The second priority was again road-related and was to fix smaller problems as required.

"This is about fixing potholes and things like that in our general road network," he said.

"It's doing whatever has to be done, whenever it needs to be done."

Priority number three was the foreshore.

"This will have quite a significant cost," Cr McDonald said.

Removal of fallen trees, sand pushing to restore beaches and fixing destroyed infrastructure were some of the jobs that needed doing all along the Fraser Coast foreshore.

Cr McDonald said work could be done in any of the areas of priority at any time and the setting of the priorities was based on which areas had suffered the most damage.