Maryborough artist George Kirk loves working with all mediums but acrylics would be his favourite.
Maryborough artist George Kirk loves working with all mediums but acrylics would be his favourite. Boni Holmes

Creating a youthful outlook

AT 97 George Kirk said it had taken a long time to grow young.

The third generation cattle farmer from Gayndah moved to Maryborough 20 years ago to retire and spend more time pursuing his favourite hobby - art.

In between raising 1300 brahman cattle and a family it was hard to find time for painting and drawing.

"Since I was very young I was always doing some form of art," Mr Kirk said.

"I rubbed shoulders with colourful Brisbane artist John Rigby who used to tell us always try to paint like children."

 

George Kirk with some of his artwork from the 1940s.
George Kirk with some of his artwork from the 1940s. Boni Holmes

He went to war where he became good friends with the nephew of accomplished Australian artist Norman Lindsay.

"I used to draw while I was in the army for three years during World War II.

"I met Peter Lindsay - we were good mates and we worked together - I learnt a bit of water colour and drawing from him."

 

Maryborough artist George Kirk with some of his artworks (clockwise from left) Land of our Fathers, Windows of Perception and Deep Creek.
VIBRANT COLOURS: Maryborough artist George Kirk with some of his artworks (clockwise from left) Land of our Fathers, Windows of Perception and Deep Creek. Boni Holmes

Mr Kirk's passion has taken him on many journeys and genres, including travelling around Central Australia with wife Peggy.

The couple rented a little house at Uluru where Mr Kirk painted and Mrs Kirk did pottery.

"I painted a lot of landscapes in pastel during that time and sold them all."

The artist said his work was experimental all the time.

 

George Kirk displays his work throughout his home in Maryborough.
George Kirk displays his work throughout his home. Boni Holmes

"If you want to know the truth, ask the children is an old saying - they look at things as they are," he said.

"That is the attitude I have taken - I am a colourist."

 

Maryborough artist George Kirk was introduced to the digital art age by his grand daughters.
Maryborough artist George Kirk was introduced to the digital art age by his grand daughters. Boni Holmes

His family has put his work on social media where high fashion designers from all over the world request his art.

His grand daughters introduced him to digital painting.

He has also written five books, transcribing his father and grandfather's war stories and writing stories of the bush, poetry, lyrical prose and children's stories.

 

George Kirk displays his work throughout his home in Maryborough.
George Kirk displays his work throughout his home in Maryborough. Boni Holmes

"I am not conventional - I always liked Roald Dahl stories - you never know what came at the end.

"I will continue to draw, write and paint until I run out of ideas."

Mr Kirk said thinks he is going to around forever.

"I only think about what I have got to do and keep going," Mr Kirk said.