Two dogs, one resembling a dingo and the other compared to a wolf, have been euthanased by Noosa Shire Council officers after numerous complaints of their aggressive and threatening behaviour. FILE PHOTO
Two dogs, one resembling a dingo and the other compared to a wolf, have been euthanased by Noosa Shire Council officers after numerous complaints of their aggressive and threatening behaviour. FILE PHOTO Gavin Ford mobiles

'Dingo and wolf' put down after stalking Ridgewood community

TWO dogs, one resembling a dingo and the other compared to a wolf, have been euthanased by Noosa Shire Council officers after Ridgewood residents made numerous complaints of their aggressive and threatening behaviour.

Complaints published predominantly through local Facebook community groups showed various residents from Carters Ridge and Ridgewood voicing their concerns about the two animals hanging around Donnellys Rd, reportedly near the Town Hall.

Describing one of the two dogs as looking "similar to a dingo" and an alaskan malamute respectively, one complainant asked if the owner was present within the group and pleaded with them to "control these dogs before someone gets hurt".

Another said they had stopped walking their dogs on Donnellys Rd after being stalked by the dogs and another said they had been "petrified" when she had been "charged" on one occasion.

A Noosa Shire Council media spokesman said "a number of complaints" had been made about "aggressive dogs" in the area.

Council local laws manager Phil Amson said as a result, officers located the animals and their owner on a nearby property.

"In the interests of public safety, the dogs were seized and later signed over to council by the owner," he said.

Mr Amson said the dogs failed a behavioural assessment and were considered unlikely to be re-homed, and were euthanased.

"Our first priority is public safety and council has a range of enforcement options under current legislation," he said.

The council spokesman said such options ranged from penalty infringement notices to court prosecution and could be accompanied by a Regulated Menacing or Dangerous Dog declaration, which required the owner/s to abide by stringent conditions for keeping the animal, including specific enclosures, muzzling in public, annual inspections and an annual registration fee of $465 per animal.

Mr Amson said the penalty for allowing a dog to wander or roam was an on-the-spot infringement notice of $261.

The spokesman confirmed the dogs were as reported, saying one "looked like a dingo" and the other a alaskan malamute.

A Gympie Regional Council spokeswoman said there was "no quota" to be met before rangers responded to reports of aggressive animals.

"If a complaint is received, it will be logged and allocated to an officer for investigation," the spokeswoman said.

"Rangers will also proactively initiate jobs they encounter on the road.

"Gympie Regional Council views dog attacks as a serious matter, rangers view wandering dogs as potentially dangerous and respond to wandering dog complaints as soon as possible to ensure the community members feel safe.

"The community has a significant responsibility to minimise the potential for dog attacks through responsible pet ownership, which safeguards both the safety of pets and people. Dogs should always be well cared for, enclosed within the resident's yard and when out must be on a lead."

More information on responsible pet ownership at www. gympie.qld.gov.au/animal- management.