Green Tag, one of the dingoes that was destroyed on Fraser Island after the latest attack – Photo Supplied Copyright Unknown
Green Tag, one of the dingoes that was destroyed on Fraser Island after the latest attack – Photo Supplied Copyright Unknown

Dingo killed for biting child day after tourist interaction

HAPPY photos and a video showing tourists interacting with a dingo on Fraser Island were shared on social media.

Just 24 hours after the photos and footage was taken, the dingo was involved in the serious mauling of a nine-year-old French boy and his mother.

A few days after that, the dingo, known as Green Tag, and another dingo involved in the attack would be dead after being destroyed by rangers on the island.

This was the sequence of events that were outlined before Maryborough Magistrates Court when Claudia Elizabeth Newman and Jamie Andrew Siddons appeared via phone call on Friday.

Newman pleaded guilty to one charge of unauthorised disturbance of an animal and Siddons pleaded guilty to unauthorised disturbance of an animal and unauthorised feeding of a dingo.

The court heard Siddons held a camping permit when he arrived on the island in February last year.

Clearly explained in the information he received was appropriate behaviour regarding dingoes.

It is illegal to interact or feed dingoes on Fraser Island, with the Department of Environment and Science warning that the habituation of dingoes can lead to negative incidents.

Three photos of the tourists interacting with a dingo were shared to social media, along with footage showing Newman interacting with a dingo.

On one of the photos, Siddons had written the caption "there's no way I wasn't feeding him".

The court heard while it was in no way suggested Siddons or Newman were responsible for the attack on the boy and his mother, it underlined why the department enforced the rules on the island and the consequences of what could happen when dingoes became habituated.

The court heard the offences were discovered because of the social media posts.

Newman and Siddons, neither of whom had any criminal history, both expressed remorse for their actions.

Magistrate Kurt Fowler said Newman and Siddons had apologised to the court and the community for their actions and appreciated the seriousness for their offending.

Newman was fined $1000 and no conviction was recorded.

Siddons was fined $2000 and also had no convictions recorded.