IN COURT: Dakoda Glen Sorensen, 21, was sentenced in Hervey Bay District Court for attacking a 68-year-old-man just weeks after receiving parole for a similar attack.
IN COURT: Dakoda Glen Sorensen, 21, was sentenced in Hervey Bay District Court for attacking a 68-year-old-man just weeks after receiving parole for a similar attack.

'Don't let them down': Attack 24 days after parole

A YOUNG man who brawled with a 68-year-old man in a supermarket while trying to take his cash had been sentenced for a similar attack just 24 days before.

Dakoda Glen Sorensen appeared in custody in Hervey Bay District Court on Wednesday to plead guilty to attempted robbery and assault occasioning bodily harm.

The 21-year-old received immediate parole from a two-year prison sentence in February for his role in the violent robbery of an elderly woman in a Hervey Bay carpark in 2018.

Crown prosecutor Jennifer O'Brien said Sorensen claimed he had dropped a $10 note in a Torquay Foodworks and when staff would not refund him the money he tried to grab the cash off a customer in line on February 28.

Sorensen and the 68-year-old man had a fist fight through the aisles of the store.

Sorensen's victim received a laceration to his eyebrow and cuts to his arms and elbow.

While fishing in River Heads on March 6, Sorensen continually punched a man in the head who took back his fishing rod that was stolen by a group Sorensen was in.

The court heard the victim was forced to hide behind his car door to get away from Sorensen.

The man identified Sorensen as his assailant after Sorensen said "you know who the f--- I am? I'm Dakoda Sorensen and I'm well known around Hervey Bay".

Defence barrister Amelia Loode said Sorensen, who had a problem with alcohol since he was 14, was drunk during both offences.

Sorensen apologised in personal letters to his victims as well as by directly addressing Judge Jennifer Rosengren.

"He has got himself in a real mess, hasn't he?" Judge Rosengren said.

"It must just break his grandparents' heart, I just look at them sitting in the back of the court and they have just given up so much. I'm just hoping he has some understanding because every time he goes to do this he needs to see their faces and realise he is just breaking them."

 

Ms Loode said Sorensen was disappointed in himself.

"He does not try to give excuse for his behaviours, he knows it was abhorrent, he knows he has let his grandparents down, as well realising the harm he has caused each of the victims," she said.

The court heard Sorensen was abandoned by his mother at two years old and had been raised by his grandparents.

About six months ago Sorensen found his mother on Facebook and tried to reach out. He also found out he had a half-sister he didn't know about.

Ms Loode said Sorensen was deeply affected when his mother began telling people he was not her son.

She said Sorensen suffered mental health issues, including drug-induced paranoid schizophrenia, although he had been clean for a few years.

 

 

Judge Rosengren said she believed Sorensen understood his behaviour was "totally and utterly unacceptable" and that he owed it to his grandparents to turn his life around.

Sorensen, who has been in prison since March 9, received a head sentence of two years' imprisonment, which is cumulative on his current sentence.

He was given an immediate parole eligibility date with 183 days declared served.