Coast women who have inspired us (from top left) Maryborough centenarian Mildred Goldsmith, Butchulla Aboriginal Corporation chair Veronica Bird with Aunty Joyce Bonner, Wide Bay Hospital and Health Service CEO Debbie Carroll, Cancer survivor and photographer Karlie Holloway and singing Hervey Bay teenager Xanthe O'Connor
Coast women who have inspired us (from top left) Maryborough centenarian Mildred Goldsmith, Butchulla Aboriginal Corporation chair Veronica Bird with Aunty Joyce Bonner, Wide Bay Hospital and Health Service CEO Debbie Carroll, Cancer survivor and photographer Karlie Holloway and singing Hervey Bay teenager Xanthe O'Connor Contributed

Editor's message, 10 inspiring stories about Coast women

Dear readers

On this International Women's Day we celebrate the inspiring ladies in our lives and local community.

In this job, we are lucky enough to meet so many modern-day heroines - from top cops and nurses on the frontline to single mums raising families while completing university degrees and community club volunteers who work so hard behind the scenes. 

Just a few of these who have featured in the past year are highlighted alongside our IWD coverage here. 

1. How IWD was celebrated in Bay 

2. How Maryborough woman became QLD Integrity Commissioner 

3. IN PHOTOS: Maryborough's IWD celebrations 

4. How autistic teen is helping others find their voice 

5. Veteran editor helped shape modern-day Maryborough 

6. Woman who wasn't supposed to live marks 100th birthday 

7. New councillor: How motherhood inspired decision to run 

8. Police officers' kind act for cancer-stricken colleague 

9. 'New chapter': Health chief ready for the fight 

10. 'Important moment' as new Island drawcard officially opened 

Over the years I have been particularly touched by the accidental advocates who have turned tragedies into inspiring campaigns. We see this now with the likes Grace Tame but I was first inspired by a local legend. 

Ligita Sternbergs, time and time again in the early years of my career, let me into her home and life.

Ligita Sternbergs, with the the book she wrote about her daughter Ingrid Lester who was murdered, is supporting the Fraser Coast Chronicle's Hands Off campaign to reduce violence.
Ligita Sternbergs, with the the book she wrote about her daughter Ingrid Lester who was murdered, is supporting the Fraser Coast Chronicle's Hands Off campaign to reduce violence. Alistair Brightman

Despite suffering through unimaginable grief following the murder of her daughter Ingrid she used her painful past to help others in the future. If you haven't read her book To the Bitter End, I encourage you to seek it out at local book stores, libraries and online. It's a harrowing but important cautionary tale and no less relevant today than it was more than a decade ago. 

I also continue to be inspired by our friend and former colleague Karlie Holloway (nee Thomsen), once a loved photographer at the Chronicle, who is playing a crucial role in raising Ovarian Cancer awareness after bravely beating the deadly disease which will take three in four of the women it invades. 

 

Karlie Holloway organizing an Afternoon Teal to raise money for ovarian cancer research. Photo: Alistair Brightman / Fraser Coast Chronicle
Karlie Holloway organises Tea for Teal fundraisers each year. Alistair Brightman

We salute these women and all their sisters who don't make headlines but are equally deserving.

As some of you are aware, I recently returned after a period of extended leave.

I'd like to thank regular readers for their support during this time (and the extraordinary events of 2020).  

Despite the challenges we have faced, being the Chronicle editor continues to be a great privilege and I look forward to the journey ahead. 

Happy International Women's Day.

Jessica Grewal, Editor 

*Confidential domestic violence support is available 24/7 via 1800 RESPECT 1800 737 732.