Emergency department's most speedy

UPDATE: Emergency department response times at Maryborough and Hervey Bay hospitals are among the quickest in Queensland.

The release of positive July figures, traditionally a high-pressure month in emergency due to colder temperatures, has bolstered morale within the health service.

The Australian Medical Association Queensland president Alex Markwell recently took aim at the Wide Bay Health Service over bed numbers, alleging emergency departments were under stress as there was no inflow of patients into hospital wards.

Wide Bay Hospital and Health Service interim CEO Kieran Keyes pointed to volumes and lack of transfers as evidence to the contrary.

"Last financial year, nearly 63,000 patients presented to Fraser Coast emergency departments, he said.

"Only around 0.5% of these patients were transferred to another facility, as it was clinically determined they needed access to specialist treatment not available locally or were transferred to a private hospital."

Fraser Coast health service management has seized on the new July figures as proof that emergency departments were coping.

"Despite July being an extremely busy month, 96% of patients in our Maryborough Hospital emergency department were transferred off stretcher and into a bed within 30 minutes," Fraser Coast director of nursing and midwifery Graham Mahaffey said.

Mr Mahaffery said the figure was similar at Hervey Bay Hospital, with 83% of patients being moved from stretchers into beds within 30 minutes.

"Our staff do not treat patients in the back of ambulances at our Fraser Coast hospital emergency departments," he said.

"When patients arrive by ambulance they are triaged and treated according to their clinical urgency inside our emergency departments."

Mr Mahaffery said front-line staff worked closely with the Queensland Ambulance Service to ensure that patients arriving by ambulance are transferred off stretcher within the department in the fastest time possible.

The United Voice union which acts for ambulance officers and monitors the issue of ambulance ramping at emergency departments was contacted yesterday but did not return calls.

The Metropolitan Emergency Department Access Initiative was a report published in July 2012 into ambulance ramping in metro hospitals.

Lack of hospital beds was cited as the main cause of overflows in emergency departments.

 

 

EARLIER: You get out of the ambulance and into the emergency departments at Maryborough and Hervey Bay hospitals quicker than almost anywhere in Queensland. 

Wide Bay Hospital and Health Service interim CEO Kieran Keyes pointed to volumes and lack of transfers as evidence to the contrary.

Fraser Coast health service management has seized on the new July figures as proof that emergency departments were coping.

"Despite July being an extremely busy month, 96% of patients in our Maryborough Hospital emergency department were transferred off stretcher and into a bed within 30 minutes," Fraser Coast director of nursing and midwifery Graham Mahaffey said.

Mr Mahaffery said the figure was similar at Hervey Bay Hospital with 83% of patients being moved from stretchers into beds within 30 minutes.

"Our staff do not treat patients in the back of ambulances at our Fraser Coast hospital emergency departments," he said.

"When patients arrive by ambulance they are triaged and treated according to their clinical urgency inside our emergency departments."

Mr Mahaffery said front line staff worked closely with the Queensland Ambulance Service to ensure that patients arriving by ambulance are transferred off stretcher within the department in the fastest time possible.

The United Voice union which acts for ambulance officers and monitors the issue of ambulance ramping at emergency departments was contacted yesterday but did not return calls.