The players who braved the rain to tee off in the annual Sunset Shootout at the Maryborough Golf Club on Friday evening.
The players who braved the rain to tee off in the annual Sunset Shootout at the Maryborough Golf Club on Friday evening. Megan Pope

Green with envy

RAIN failed to wash away the delight of Bob Woodger on the ninth hole at the Maryborough Golf Club on Friday night.

He had just won a new set of clubs after holding his nerve and composure to beat 19 other players and win the 12th annual Sunset Shootout.

Mother Nature really tried her best to make life tough though for all the players, including juniors as well as seniors.

The rain forced organisers to cancel their original plan to get the 20 players, who earned their chance to take part in the event by answering a question on MIX FM, to tee off from the opposite bank of Ululah Lagoon to the club for their single shot at glory.

They reverted back to the normal tee on the par three but that didn't bother Woodger.

Neither did the fact that he had to go last.

He just watched as nerves got the better of many players in the line-up.

Only six players found the green while plenty of others saw their little white ball end up in a watery grave, one of the greenside bunkers or roll off the green and out of contention.

The ball must stay on the green and whoever finishes nearest the pin won.

Woodger, a member of the host club for more than 20 years, finished 2.05m away.

Greg Kettle finished second (4.26m) despite using a borrowed club while hot favourite, the big-hitting Peter Baker (6.86m) had to settle for third.

Woodger, who plays off a handicap of 15, said he was thrilled with his win.

"It wasn't a bad effort considering it felt as though it (the ball) didn't come off the club at all well," he said.

"Saying that, it got the job done and that's what counts.

"You could say it was a case of lucky last."

Lucky may have indeed played a role in his success.

Woodger changed his mind about the winning shot only seconds before he teed off.

"I had a seven iron in my hands but the wind picked up," he said.

"I changed to a six and I am so glad I did now."