KEEP WATCH: The American corn snake is one of the pests targeted under Fraser Coast Regional Council's biosecurity plan.
KEEP WATCH: The American corn snake is one of the pests targeted under Fraser Coast Regional Council's biosecurity plan. Queensland Government

How council plans to keep problem pests out of Fraser Coast

FROM American corn snakes to slash pines and feral deer, the Fraser Coast Regional Council is urging the public to keep their eyes out for unwanted pests.

A new biosecurity plan aimed at stopping the invasion of noxious weeds and pest animals across the area is set to be adopted by the council.

The 2019/2022 Fraser Coast Biosecurity Plan, to be the subject of discussion at today's council meeting, is aimed at managing a host of invasive plants and animals.

The plan includes some that are already in the region and others that could become a problem in the future.

The council is already managing outbreaks of noxious plants across the region.

These include African fountain grass, known to be present in Urangan, annual ragweed, found in Booral, and slash pines, found across the Fraesr Coast,

Others, such as African box thorn, had not been found in the region, but were a high risk due to infestations in neighbouring council areas.

Pest animals will also be targeted under the plan - even those not currently found in the region.

While feral goats and American corn snakes were not currently found in the region, both could potentially become a problem in they were introduced.

Red-eared slider turtles, often distributed through Queensland via the illegal pet trade, could also have serious repercussions for the region, competing with native turtles for food and space.

Meanwhile, other pests were already present in the region, including yellow crazy ants in Urangan, foxes, rabbits, feral pigs, wild dogs and cats, Indian mynas and the pest fish, tilapia.

Councillor James Hansen said the plan incorporated the accumulated experience and expert knowledge of council staff, residents and the Weed and Pest Advisory Committee members.

"Controlling invasive weeds and animals is a huge cost for landholders, including council," he said.

"While council has a lead role in controlling invasive weeds and animals, we cannot do it alone."