Public tip-offs led to more than $300,000 worth of drugs being taken off Fraser Coast streets in 2017.
Public tip-offs led to more than $300,000 worth of drugs being taken off Fraser Coast streets in 2017. Pixabay

How locals took $300,000 in drugs off Fraser Coast streets

PUBLIC tip-offs led to more than $300,000 worth of drugs being taken off Fraser Coast streets in 2017.

New data from Crime Stoppers Queensland has revealed the massive role tip-offs play in helping bust drug networks.

Hervey Bay Crime Stoppers received 445 tips from the public, helping police seize $43,035 of drugs.

In Maryborough, there were 402 tips to Crime Stoppers. Those tip-offs helped police take $284,730 of drugs off the streets.

This does not include drugs police seized without any public tip-offs.

Crime Stoppers Maryborough president James Kirk, who has been with Crime Stoppers for 22 years, said it had been a successful year for the community but was unsure what the future held.

"The biggest problem we've noticed in the district is drugs, and that is a big problem everywhere," he said.

"Drugs ruin a lot of people's lives, young ones they get hooked on the drugs and then other crimes follow, stealing to raise money to fuel their habit."

Mr Kirk said Crime Stoppers collected information from the public and also raised funds to help pay out rewards.

"That's our main task, we do get people approach us. The people phone in and they don't have to disclose who they are, and if there is something big and they want the reward they pay out the reward," he said.

"One of the things we're looking for, is people to be on the committee. We're always looking for members."

Statewide, drug notifications made up two thirds of calls to the service.

Crime Stoppers Queensland CEO Trevor O'Hara said the figures showed how committed Queenslanders were to reducing crime.

"Without the support from the public in 2017, we can assume 2812 individuals would not have been arrested for criminal activity and more than $8 million worth of drugs would still be on the streets. Queenslanders should be proud of the outcomes their reports have achieved," he said.

"We're seeing from the unwavering influx of intelligence received from the public that drug possession, supply and production are still prevalent issues in Queensland, and it's high on the community's agenda to prevent these crimes."

Across Queensland in 2017, 984 drug supply charges were laid following tip-offs to Crime Stoppers, an increase of two thirds on the charges laid in 2017.

Queensland Police would not comment on the role Crime Stoppers played in helping crack down on the state's drug trade.

To report a crime anonymously, visit www.crimestoppersqld.com.au or phone 1800 333 000. -NewsRegional