LESS than a day after calls for the town to be called the world's first Whale Heritage Site, Hervey Bay has proved why it is deserving of the title.

Whale tour operators spotted the first humpback whale frolicking in the region's at the weekend, more than a month ahead of the official start of the Fraser Coast's whale season.

Naturalist Rachael Nidiffer spotted the sub-adult whale just off Fraser Island about 9.30am on Saturday with the crew of whale tour operator Tasman Venture.

She said it was fairly unusual to see due to whale season not starting until mid-July.

"We were heading up into Platypus Bay and gazing out to the horizon, we saw what we thought was the back of the whale diving," Ms Nidiffer said.

"We all had that look of disbelief.

"Humpbacks do a trickle migration, so they slowly trickle in and we may get some early arrivals or stragglers towards the end of the season."

The weekend sighting follows the World Cetacean Alliance confirming Hervey Bay was in the race to become world's first Whale Heritage Site.

The accreditation, launched by the WCA and a partnership between more than 100 non-profit organisations in 40 countries, aims to highlight responsible watching areas that promote conservation of habitats through tourism, education and research.

Ms Nidiffer, who previously helped with whale tours in Maui, Hawaii, said Hervey Bay was "phenomenal" compared to the two and more deserving of the title.

"Whales use this areas as a resting place, they're not on a migratory mission so they exhibit all these unique behaviours," she said.

"The Bay is also quite shallow so it creates more opportunity to see them on the surface.

"I think to achieve this we need to get the word out that this is a unique part of the world to see these gentle giants."

Hervey Bay marine biologist Yvonne Mills said the weekend sighting of the first whale didn't indicate an early start to a season, but rather the start of an early migration of the whales up the coast.

She told the Chronicle Hervey Bay was the only place whales could be seen frolicking and communicating with their babies compared to areas like the Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast.

"Being called a Heritage Site... will be really important, economically and for tourist attraction," Ms Mills said.

"We need to push the fact the area is really unique.

"Tourism needs to focus on the fact whales come close to us and we're not chasing them."

The result of Hervey Bay's bid for the Whale Heritage Site recognition will be known later this year.