Dingo-related offences ranked the third highest with 15 Penalty Infringement Notices handed out across the past year.
Dingo-related offences ranked the third highest with 15 Penalty Infringement Notices handed out across the past year. Kingfisher Bay Resort

REVEALED: The hefty fines hitting Fraser Island visitors

FRASER Island visitors have been slapped with more than $28,600 in fines by the Department of Environment and Science in the last 12 months.

From March 2018 to March 2019, data has revealed 104 Penalty Infringement Notices have been issued on K'gari.

Dingo-related offences ranked the third highest with 15 PINs handed out.

Topping the list was fire offences, with 23 PINs, followed by 19 camping permit offences.

Fifteen PINs were issued relating to motor vehicle offences while 10 were related to unlawful camping offences.

Domestic animal offences and vegetation offences rounded out the list with seven offences each.

The total value of PIN offences issued in the past year was $28,688.

The number of dingo-related PINs has decreased in recent years, with data from the last five years showing 15 in 2014, 21 in 2015 and then a peak of 30 in 2016 before dropping in 2017 to 11.

According to the DES website, it is an offence to feed or make food available to a dingo or intentionally attract or disturb a dingo anywhere on Fraser Island, whether on public or private land.

It is also an offence to hang bait or berley bags on the outside of vehicles, in trees or have these lying around, throw any fish or fish remains and bait to dingoes or other wildlife.

Tourists can also be fined for feeding or making food and rubbish available for wildlife, regardless of being inside or outside a fenced area.

A DES spokesman said rangers took a zero tolerance approach to dingo management issues on the popular tourist destination.

"The Queensland Government is committed to the ongoing safety of visitors to the island," he said.

"The department will be working in partnership with the Butchulla people to boost safety, compliance and education measures.

"This includes proposed higher penalties for people who intentionally feed dingoes, new fenced camping sites and a new Butchulla community education ranger."

Penalties for intentionally feeding or disturbing dingoes are proposed to increase to a minimum of $2088 and a maximum of $10,444 per offence.

"The Queensland Government is committed to supporting a sustainable and healthy dingo population," the spokesman said.