Climate Emergency Debate
Climate Emergency Debate

Labor fails to support own climate emergency appeal

LABOR is running dead on it's own bid to declare a climate emergency.

The party was ridiculed when just five Labor MPs showed up to its own move to have the Parliament declare a climate emergency, with none present from Queensland.

It follows Labor MPs and former Members criticising the move as a stunt, that forgets workers and hurts then in central Queensland.

Labor's Mark Butler and Tim Watts during the Climate Emergency debate at Parliament House in Canberra. Picture: Gary Ramage
Labor's Mark Butler and Tim Watts during the Climate Emergency debate at Parliament House in Canberra. Picture: Gary Ramage

The Opposition, despite last week revealing it would move to declare a climate emergency, is yet to hold a press conference, ask a question to the government on it or have Opposition leader Anthony Albanese mention it.

Hinkler MP Keith Pitt ridiculed Labor's lack of turn out to it's own emergency.

"If it's so important to those opposite, let's count how many there are - there were five, now there are four," he said.

"It's so important to declare a climate emergency they haven't even filled the chamber." Opposition leader Anthony Albanese, who is yet to say anything in support of the motion, defended the lack of turn out saying "people have meetings in this building".

"The idea that an issue's importance is determined by how many people in the chamber I don't think stands up to scrutiny," he said.

Since revealing they would declare a climate emergency, Labor frontbenchers have been all but silent on the issue, making just three references to it.

Two of these came when the matter was raised with frontbenchers in an interview, while Labor's Northern Australia spokesman Murray Watt issued a statement rejecting the government's claims it would shut down the coal industry.

The vote on the private member's bill to declare a climate emergency has been delayed to a future date.

Opposition climate change spokesman Mark Butler said the motion was not about substantive police but "an attempt to have Parliament recognise the gravity of the situation".

"We're failing our children, we're failing and grandchildren and generations beyond that," he said.