ON THE MOVE: This huge sea snake was spotted on the beach in Hervey Bay on Father’s Day on the incoming tide.
ON THE MOVE: This huge sea snake was spotted on the beach in Hervey Bay on Father’s Day on the incoming tide. Contributed

Residents to remain vigilant after sea snake sighting

PEOPLE swimming in Fraser Coast waters have been reminded to be vigilant of sea snakes after a sighting on a Hervey Bay beach.

On Father's Day a Chronicle reader snapped a picture of the large snake washed up on the beach.

A Queensland Parks and Wildlife spokeswoman said while sea snakes did not usually pose a risk to humans, people entering the water should be wary.

"Some species of sea snakes are native, they are not considered an endangered or vulnerable species, and if left alone they generally pose little risk to people's safety," she said.

"People should not approach sea snakes and they should exercise the same caution if they see one as they should in the vicinity of any marine animal in the wild - leave them alone and move away from them."

The sighting of a sea snake coincides with the first days of spring and the beginning of snake season.

In the past week Fraser Coast snake catcher Roy McGrath removed several red-bellied black snakes from the Eli Waters area.

He said the warmer weather meant residents can expect to see more of the slithering reptiles in backyards.

"Make sure the cracks around your doors and windows are sealed," he said.

The region is no stranger to snake encounters with 25 people admitted to the Hervey Bay Hospital last summer with possible snake bites, while there were 11 at the Maryborough Hospital.

BITE FIRST AID

Do not wash the area

Bandage the bite firmly and limit movement

Seek medical attention