DON'T TOUCH: If you come across a baby bat, it's important that qualified carers or rescuers are called immediately.
DON'T TOUCH: If you come across a baby bat, it's important that qualified carers or rescuers are called immediately. ANGELA BELL

Look out for distressed, dead bats

IT'S baby bat season for some of our beautiful local flying fox species.

The Fraser Coast has three species of flying foxes that at times reside in the region - blacks, grey-headed and little reds.

Black and grey-headed flying foxes, give birth to their young starting in September-October each year.

Baby season continues on for several weeks with individuals giving birth at various times.

For many weeks mother bats carry their fully dependent baby on their body.

If you see a dead flying fox anywhere, including on power lines, fencing, fruit tree netting or on the ground, it is important it is checked to make sure it is not a deceased mother with a live baby on board.

Even with power line victims, the baby bat can remain alive even though the adult has been killed.

The baby will need to be rescued (which WRFC organise with the help of Ergon) to prevent a slow and distressing death from starvation and exposure.

Please report any dead flying fox sightings to Wildlife Rescue Fraser Coast on 4121 3146 (available 24/7, 365 days), so they can be checked to ensure there is not a live orphaned baby.

Baby flying foxes

cannot fly for several months and are fully dependent on their mothers for milk and survival.

They do at times become separated from their mothers when out with

 

her travelling for food, so if you see a baby bat - or any sort or size bat in need of help - please call WRFC as soon as possible.

Please remember not to touch a bat of any kind, age or size.

Only vaccinated, experienced and permitted bat carers or rescuers should handle bats.