Mango growers are exploring options to export a surplus of fruit that is grown in Far North Queensland. Gennaro Arena of Barron River Gold Mangoes exports all of his R2E2 mangoes grown on his orchid near Mareeba to the Middle East. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKE
Mango growers are exploring options to export a surplus of fruit that is grown in Far North Queensland. Gennaro Arena of Barron River Gold Mangoes exports all of his R2E2 mangoes grown on his orchid near Mareeba to the Middle East. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKE

How our mango exports to China could grow 200 per cent

THE Far North region's role as a major player in the mango industry could help unlock even greater exporting potential to China in the near future.

Cooperative Research Centre for Developing Northern Australia has today announced a $2.24 million project, which promises to boost northern Australian mango exports into China by 200 per cent within five years.

Mango growers are exploring options to export a surplus of fruit that is grown in Far North Queensland. Gennaro Arena of Barron River Gold Mangoes exports all of his R2E2 mangoes grown on his orchid near Mareeba to the Middle East. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKE
Mango growers are exploring options to export a surplus of fruit that is grown in Far North Queensland. Gennaro Arena of Barron River Gold Mangoes exports all of his R2E2 mangoes grown on his orchid near Mareeba to the Middle East. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKE

The research collaboration between Australia's leading Calypso mango exporter Perfection Fresh, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and the University of Queensland, will use the latest in supply chain management, quality assessment tools and information technology platforms to identify and resolve issues impeding the export of mangoes into China.

The CRCNA has committed $952,471 towards the project, with the remainder of the project funded via cash and in-kind contributions from project participants.

Calypso mango orchards in Mareeba and Dimbulah are among those that have been selected as research locations.

FNQ Growers president Joe Moro said any efforts to increase capacity into China would alleviate pressure on the domestic market.

He said improvements made to exporting Calypso mangoes would also have a flow-on effect to other varieties, in particular R2E2 which is popular with the Chinese.

"The Mareeba/Dimbulah mango growing region is probably be the biggest region in Australia," he said.

"The Chinese already know our product is very good and it's just how we get the product there up to the standard.

"Any efforts to increase direct freight will be a good thing for the industry and China's a huge market.

"I think the funding will definitely help increase volumes into China …."

Perfection spokesman Andrew Edwards said shifting from an airfreight transport model to sea freight would be a key focus of the research.

"Transporting mangoes via sea freight will transform the industry from a low volume Australian export participant, more than tripling current export value to over $20 million per year, within the next three to five years," he said.

 

BROADER IMPACT

DRAWING on earlier research and investment from Perfection and DAF, the project will facilitate the adoption of improved supply chain systems. The project is expected to be completed by mid-2021. CRCNA chief executive officer Jed Matz said although the initial focus was on the Calypso mango supply chain, it's expected any improvements would be shared with the broader industry.

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