Wallaroos hooker Ben Waters. Wallaroos v Maryborough Brothers at Eskdale Park, Maryborough.
Wallaroos hooker Ben Waters. Wallaroos v Maryborough Brothers at Eskdale Park, Maryborough. Matthew McInerney

MARYBOROUGH PROUD: Much more than just a footy club

HUNDREDS of faces stare out of the photographs hanging on the wall at Maryborough Sports Club.

The men in them all share a common bond, regardless of age or era - they all pulled on the blue and white jersey and played their hearts out for the Maryborough Wallaroos.

The Wallaroos were formed in 1883 and played rugby union before switching to league in 1910.

They are the oldest rugby league club in Australia, one that has not missed a season since its inception and at least 45 A-grade premierships to its name.

Maryborough - Wallaroos Rugby League have teamed with major sponsor Port City Autos. (Front to Back - Left to Right) Port City Autos General Manager Mike Waters, Laiklyn Jung, Matthew Walker, Luke Waters, Sam Hutchins, Joey Alberts, Harley Brown, Joel Richards, Corey Hellmuth. (Back) Mason Atkinson, Joshua Crowley, Brandon Law, Todd Campbell, Ben Turner, Captain Jack Horder, Alex Mallam, Ben Waters, William Jung, David Ball, Jesse Robertson and Coach Peter Waters.
Maryborough - Wallaroos Rugby League have teamed with major sponsor Port City Autos. (Front to Back - Left to Right) Port City Autos General Manager Mike Waters, Laiklyn Jung, Matthew Walker, Luke Waters, Sam Hutchins, Joey Alberts, Harley Brown, Joel Richards, Corey Hellmuth. (Back) Mason Atkinson, Joshua Crowley, Brandon Law, Todd Campbell, Ben Turner, Captain Jack Horder, Alex Mallam, Ben Waters, William Jung, David Ball, Jesse Robertson and Coach Peter Waters. Valerie Horton


There are some famous names that have been connected to the club over the years.

In 1961, when Queensland Origin legend Mal Meninga was just a year old, his dad Norm coached the Wallaroos.

He gave a speech at the club's 115th celebrations in 2008.

This year the club is celebrating its 125th anniversary.

For several years Colin Scott, who played in the inaugural State of Origin match, coached the Wallaroos.

He said he had many fond memories of his time with the club, in particular winning the 2009 Bundaberg Rugby League premiership.

In his list of achievements, Mr Scott put playing alongside Arthur Beetson first, his premiership wins second and coaching the Wallaroos third.

He said he was proud of his time with the Wallaroos.

"For sure, the Wallaroos are the oldest rugby league club in Queensland," he said.

Thanks to Mr Scott, each year the Wallaroos and their rivals the Isis Devils play for a shield named in honour of two of the indigenous greats from both clubs, Malcolm Vea Vea and Danny Fewquandie.

The year the Wallaroos won the Bundaberg Rugby League premiership, a mix of players from Maryborough and Cherbourg combined to lift the trophy.

As a man who is proud of his Aboriginal heritage, Mr Scott said it was great to see indigenous and non-indigenous players come together and enjoy the sport they loved while making new friendships during his time at the club.

"That's what rugby league is all about," he said.

"That was a big highlight in my career."

Wallaroos president Scott Robertson said inclusive culture was still very much part of the club today.

"Our team culture is blue and white forever, no matter what race, nationality or religion," he said.

"When you play for the Wallaroos you are all family and the players, committee members and supporters all pass on this feeling of family."

The Wallaroos bench, (from left) trainer Wayne Hellmuth (orange shirt), Corey Hellmuth, coach Peter Waters, captain Jack Horder and prop Jesse Robertson, watches on. Bundaberg Rugby League grand final: Wallaroos v Past Brothers at Salter Oval, Bundaberg.
The Wallaroos bench, (from left) trainer Wayne Hellmuth (orange shirt), Corey Hellmuth, coach Peter Waters, captain Jack Horder and prop Jesse Robertson, watches on. Bundaberg Rugby League grand final: Wallaroos v Past Brothers at Salter Oval, Bundaberg. Matthew McInerney