MATHS CHAMPIONS: Fraser Coast finalists Jack Scanlan, Lara Christ and Aaron Shanmugan from Fraser Coast Anglican College, who will compete in the grande finale of USC's Maths Modelling Challenge today..
MATHS CHAMPIONS: Fraser Coast finalists Jack Scanlan, Lara Christ and Aaron Shanmugan from Fraser Coast Anglican College, who will compete in the grande finale of USC's Maths Modelling Challenge today.. Contributed

MEETING OF THE MINDS: Math whizzes headline uni challenge

FROM solving equations to saving the environment, these kids have got all the brains they need to stand out with the state's best students.

Fraser Coast Anglican College students Jack Scanlan, Lara Christ and Aaron Shanmugan have been named as one of the top school groups to compete in the grand finale of USC's Maths Modelling Challenge.

The talented group will journey to USC's Sunshine Coast campus at Sippy Downs on Wednesday to compete with other schools from across the state.

Another group from Urangan State High School, consisting of Jacob Killer, Seb Clarke and Ryan Wheatley, was also successful in getting through to the finals.

MATHLETES IN ACTION:  St Mary's College students Maddy Kenny, Lauren Winnett, Lucy Hyne and Omena Ibe competing in the regional round of the Maths Modelling Challenge at USC's campus in Hervey Bay.
MATHLETES IN ACTION: St Mary's College students Maddy Kenny, Lauren Winnett, Lucy Hyne and Omena Ibe competing in the regional round of the Maths Modelling Challenge at USC's campus in Hervey Bay. Contributed

Both groups used modelling to help solve how many trees were needed to provide a year's circulation of the Fraser Coast Chronicle and the difference it would make if one family switched to a digital format.

But instead of tackling questions surrounding how a digital transition would help save trees, they'll be answering a complex, open-ended mathematical problem based on this year's National Science Week theme 'Destination Moon: More Missions, More Science'.

Guided by a USC mathematician or statistician, the students will use present their solutions and a poster to judges, teachers, USC academics and other students.

STEM project officer at USC Marina Fitzpatrick said the university started the challenge as a way of inspiring students to see maths as a fun, exciting way to solve real-world scenarios.