GUIDED TOURS: Tourists visiting Maryborough's Gallipoli to Armistice Museum. Volunteers from the Maryborough Military and Colonial Museum will lead guided tours of the site as part of an arrangement with the council.
GUIDED TOURS: Tourists visiting Maryborough's Gallipoli to Armistice Museum. Volunteers from the Maryborough Military and Colonial Museum will lead guided tours of the site as part of an arrangement with the council. Contributed

Museum group to head tours of popular M'boro memorial

VOLUNTEERS from the Maryborough Military and Colonial Museum will soon start conducting tours of the Gallipoli to Armistice memorial in Queen's Park.

The move is a sign of the memorial's ongoing popularity in the region after it was opened by a host of dignitaries in July last year.

The Fraser Coast Regional Council and the museum group have signed an agreement, allowing volunteers to guide tourists and school groups through the memorial and provide valuable insights into the history of World War I.

Fraser Coast mayor George Seymour said the council had also waived any fees associated with conducting the tours "in recognition of the museum's charitable status and the important role they play in preserving and promoting military history".

"It is important that we keep this history alive, not to glorify war, but to show how war affects people, from those fighting and those left behind," Cr Seymour said.

"And it reminds us of the sacrifices that have been made for us to appreciate the freedoms and lifestyle that we enjoy today."

Museum director John Meyers said there were already 15 bookings from schools across the state wanting tours of the memorial.

Year 9 students from Riverside Christian College were among the region's first schools to receive the guided tours last month.

"It is a very popular excursion and we've had a good response from schools between Caloundra and Bundaberg," Mr Meyers said.

"In April, 100 students from a Redcliffe high school will visit."

The museum is working with a bus company to develop the tours.

The site has become a popular tourist attraction on the Fraser Coast, with dozens of school classes from across the state have already toured the site as part of their history lessons.