Fraser Coast Volunteer First Aid Services president and Fraser Coast Regional Council IT Support Co-ordinator David Coleman says the founding members created their own volunteer-based organisation in the face of rising costs from other first aid organisations.
Fraser Coast Volunteer First Aid Services president and Fraser Coast Regional Council IT Support Co-ordinator David Coleman says the founding members created their own volunteer-based organisation in the face of rising costs from other first aid organisations. Contributed

New Fraser Coast group set to teach first aid

AN INTERIOR designer, an IT manager and a paramedic have come together to form a organisation that will teach first aid across the region.

The trio formed Fraser Coast Volunteer First Aid Services to provide first aid services for schools, community groups and events from Tin Can Bay to Childers at a cost event organisers and community groups could afford.

FCVFAS president and Fraser Coast Regional Council IT support co-ordinator David Coleman said the founding members created their own volunteer-based organisation in the face of rising costs from other first aid organisations.

It is the second group Mr Coleman has helped form; he was instrumental in setting up a group on the Sunshine Coast.

"Many not-for-profit community events have to choose between paying for first aid, holding the event without first aid or simply using a less skilled and equipped member of their club or school," he said.

"We want to look after the community properly for a minimal cost, so we ask for a donation that covers the costs we are likely to incur while we are at an event."

"Nobody is paid, so every cent that is donated we use to buy equipment and carry out more training for our volunteers."

Paramedic Grant Geddes believes the service is much-needed.

"With limited or inadequate first aid provided at events it inevitably increases demand on the Queensland Ambulance Service," he said.

"And often the QAS is responding to relatively minor issues that really are not an emergency and divert resources from more urgent cases."

The registered charity has received a $5000 grant from the Fraser Coast Regional Council and a $33,000 grant from the Gambling Community Benefit Fund to help it get started.