Dangerous cladding allowed the fire at Grenfell Tower in London to spread so quickly. Picture: AFP
Dangerous cladding allowed the fire at Grenfell Tower in London to spread so quickly. Picture: AFP

New warning signs for dangerous cladding

PRIVATE building owners will be legally obliged to display signage warning tenants if their building contains a combustible cladding that was responsible for 72 deaths during an inferno in the UK last year.

Owners of high rise buildings built after 1994 will be required to complete an online questionnaire, under new regulations, to determine if their building is considered "at risk" from the dangerous cladding.

Anyone identified by the Queensland Building and Construction Commission will be required to have their building inspected by a fire engineer to determine remedy methods.

Remedy methods could include removing all the cladding from the building to installing extra fire sprinklers in fire hot spots.

Mr de Brenni said he expected about 10,000 of the 12,000 privately owned high-rise buildings in Queensland to be cleared of needing further investigation after the test.

"For the small minority that need further investigation, stage 2 is to engage a building industry professional to determine if there are materials which are potentially combustible," he said.

"Stage 3 is to engage a fire engineer to assess potential risk."

It's understood a government-owned high rise cost only $12,000 to rectify last year.

The move comes as more than 20,000sq m of the dangerous cladding was found on the Princess Alexandra Hospital, and is expected to cost millions of dollars to remove.