Clive
Clive

Palmer’s $106k airport parking fee

CLIVE Palmer has two 155-seat jets on the tarmac at Brisbane Airport, and they haven't left the ground in about 10 years. But a recent short trip by one of the planes has set tongues wagging.

But despite not gracing the skies for years, one of the planes has recently been on the move, sparking speculation Mr Palmer could be trying to offload the burden of financing his grounded jets.

Mr Palmer’s two McDonell Douglas MD-82 jets, bearing the livery of his company Mineralogy, parked back to back at Brisbane airport in 2016.
Mr Palmer’s two McDonell Douglas MD-82 jets, bearing the livery of his company Mineralogy, parked back to back at Brisbane airport in 2016.

Both of the former politician's McDonnell Douglas MD-82 jets, which were worth about $5 million each five years ago, had been parked tail-to-tail for years on a disused taxiway north of the domestic terminal.

Exposed to Queensland's harsh climate and the salty sea air, the jets have clearly deteriorated over the years with peeling and corroded paint visible.

But within the past month, one of the jets was moved to a logistics apron south of the International Terminal, closer to maintenance hangars.

The relative flurry of activity involved in the 4.5km journey across the airfield has fuelled rumours within the plane-spotting community that Mr Palmer could be preparing to finally put one or both on the market.

There are rumours that Clive Palmer might be preparing to put one of his jets on the market. File picture: Dave Hunt/AAP
There are rumours that Clive Palmer might be preparing to put one of his jets on the market. File picture: Dave Hunt/AAP

It's not clear if the planes could even be brought back to working condition after so many years of neglect, ­however any sale would at least relieve Mr Palmer of his staggering annual parking bill.

Unless the businessman has negotiated a private deal, he would have to pay $149.96 a day to park each jet at the airport.

It's believed the parking bills for both jets, which would have reached about $106,000 for the 2018-19 ­financial year, have been kept up to date, allowing the planes to remain there.

The daily fee is set to jump by $3.75 per day from July 1, bumping the yearly bill to about $110,000 a year for the two jets.

Mr Palmer, who is believed to be overseas, could not be reached for comment yesterday.

Both jets are decked out in the livery of Mr Palmer's company Mineralogy and registered under that name in the Cayman Islands.

According to Cayman ­Islands Civil Aviation Authority documents, the registrations of both planes were current at the start of this month.