Sand is loaded onto a large dump truck at Tooan Tooan Creek before being moved into smaller trucks for the trip to Torquay beach.
Sand is loaded onto a large dump truck at Tooan Tooan Creek before being moved into smaller trucks for the trip to Torquay beach. Alistair Brightman

Torquay's erosion problem may be solved within a year

A LONG-term solution to Torquay's erosion problem might be in place within a year, Fraser Coast Mayor Gerard O'Connell says.

His comments come with a 3000 cubic metre sand shift under way to shore up parts of Torquay beach, near the caravan park, ahead of 4.2m king tides expected at the end of the month.

The Fraser Coast Regional Council has previously indicated the project would cost $160,000 - the Mayor said on Tuesday that expense was unsustainable for a short-term solution.

On longer-term erosion control, he said: "That few hundred metres or kilometre or whatever the length is, if that's the priority and it's got to be done in six to 12 months: what do we need to do? And how do we go about doing it? I reckon those are the things we need to answer first.

"I would hope (that something could be achieved in that time) because I think that's what we need to do.

"If in February, for example, we can have a good, well-informed discussion with the State (Government) about what is possible in terms of approval and then look at the costing.

"This won't be a cheap exercise. I can bet."

Cr O'Connell said he hoped for state and federal funds assistance for the project and said ratepayers would not face huge rate rises.

He said State Environment Minister Andrew Powell would be invited to see the erosion problem, and the council would complete a report on how to address it.

Cr O'Connell said the region's coastal management plan was being used to help deal with the problem - and work was under way to develop a new Fraser Coast Shoreline Erosion Management Plan.

The council previously indicated the short-term solution involved bulk sandbags being filled with sand and tied at the top. They will then be partially buried in the sand with more sand backfilled behind them.

The sand pits

Erosion problem flared after strong winds and high tides on weekend of January 4-5

The highest tides of the year are expected on January 31, predicted to reach 4.2m in Hervey Bay.