JUST four months after being resold and rebranded – from Happy Days to 50s Diner – the reopening of a popular Bay restaurant was delayed.

But now, a year on, this family of four is changing the diner’s predicted path, welcoming customers as of Monday.

Kellie and Ross Green, with their two children Skye, 16, and Cooper, 10, have together rebuilt and “rebooted” the Scarness eatery at 352 the Esplanade.

Ross and Kellie Green are keen to be bringing the 50s Diner back to locals, incorporating their own little touches. Picture: Isabella Magee
Ross and Kellie Green are keen to be bringing the 50s Diner back to locals, incorporating their own little touches. Picture: Isabella Magee

Excitement fills the air on launch morning at the place the public has been “been waiting for”.

“It’s a unique experience here, it’s different,” Ross tells the Chronicle.

“We’ve rebooted (the diner), it’s our own, it’s not a carbon copy of Maryborough’s Happy Days.

“The public has been great, we’ve been getting lots of positive feedback.

“This is something they’ve been waiting for to open, they’ve been missing (the diner).”

And customers aren’t the only ones hula hooping around, with Cooper taking the day off school to give a helping hand throughout the first day of business.

Hang out with some friends, or Elvis, as you enjoy some snacks along the Esplanade. Picture: Isabella Magee
Hang out with some friends, or Elvis, as you enjoy some snacks along the Esplanade. Picture: Isabella Magee

“Skye was in this morning helping too, before she had to go to school,” says Kellie, who’s dressed in a retro red, white spotted skirt.

“She’ll be working in here, as well.”

A classic 50s style exudes the diner and into the streets. Picture: Isabella Magee
A classic 50s style exudes the diner and into the streets. Picture: Isabella Magee

You can expect great food mixed with a classic 50s diner vibe, and another ingredient added to the restaurant this time ‘round.

“We want the diner to keep the family-feel … to be a family business,” Ross added.

“We came here back when it was called Happy Days and loved it … we thought: ‘Why not?’.”