The frigate HMAS Diamantina which was built at the Walkers Ltd shipyards. PHOTO: Contributed.
The frigate HMAS Diamantina which was built at the Walkers Ltd shipyards. PHOTO: Contributed.

Remembering a M’boro legend: The HMAS Diamantina

THE HMAS Diamantina has a rich history, with both wartime and research breakthroughs occurring during her time of service.

The vessel was ordered as part of Australia’s shipbuilding program during World War Two.

The Diamantina was built to British River Class design at Walkers in Maryborough.

According to the official Australian Navy website, the Diamantina was named after the river in central west Queensland.

She was commissioned at Hervey Bay on April 27, 1945 and is considered to be one of the last remaining World War Two River Class frigates in the world.

The frigate served in New Guinea waters during the latter part of World War II.

The Queensland Maritime Museum details how the surrenders of Japanese forces at Nauru and Ocean Islands were signed on-board the Diamantina.

After the war, the ship was placed in reserve until being recommissioned in 1959 as an oceanographic, meteorological and hydrographic research vessel.

The museum said the Diamantina conducted important operations in the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Timor Sea, Coral Sea and Pacific Ocean over the next 20 years.

On February 8, 1960 scientists on-board the Diamantin a discovered what is now known as the Diamantina Fracture Zone – the then deepest known part of the Indian Ocean.

The zone, some 150,000 square nautical miles in the Southern and Indian Oceans, was named in her honour.

The frigate was presented to the Queensland Maritime Museum in 1980.

She remains on permanent display in the dry dock at South Brisbane.