RENT REFORM WOES: The State Government has proposed new laws to allow renters to make minor alterations to their properties and keep pets, but realtors say this is a bad move that will damage the property market.
RENT REFORM WOES: The State Government has proposed new laws to allow renters to make minor alterations to their properties and keep pets, but realtors say this is a bad move that will damage the property market.

Rent reforms hurt tenants and owners, Coast realtors say

TENANTS could keep pets and make minor changes to properties under new rental reforms being proposed by the State Government.

But Fraser Coast realtors claim the changes would drive up rent prices and create a rental property shortage.

Under the proposed reforms, property owners would not be allowed to refuse pet applications without sufficient grounds.

Tenants would also be allowed to modify properties for disability or safety reasons.

Housing minister Mick de Brenni said the government had received 15,000 responses to the proposed reforms.

"These rental protections are designed to keep Queenslanders safe at home in their rental properties," Mr de Brenni said.

"We will take all of this feedback into account... to ensure we achieve a fair middle ground."

Realtors across the Fraser Coast see the reforms as a slap in the face.

Wendy Thomsen, a property manager with One Realty Sales and Rentals, said the reforms would make it harder for owners and tenants alike.

"Owners will need to put up the rent to cover the costs," Ms Thomsen said.

"When the story broke, we had a lot of owners ring up and say they would sell if the reforms came in.

"In an already tight market, less properties means higher rent and more difficulty in finding a place."

Ray White Hervey Bay manager Rachel Stephenson said there was a risk of property investors leaving the market as "security in their investment" was taken from them. However, she said she supported reforms around the minimal standards for the safety and security of tenants.

REIQ chief executive Antonia Mercorella said abolishing a landlord's right to not renew tenancy agreements "undermines fundamental principles of contract law".

But Fraser Coast realtors claim the changes would drive up rent prices and create a shortage of rental properties in the area, should they be adopted.