AT DOUG Waters' home on the banks of the Burrum River, Butchulla elder Glen Miller points out where indigenous people ate thousands of years ago.

After a tour of Mr Waters' remote home yesterday, Mr Miller declared the site as a significant one in Butchulla history.

Mangroves now grow on the banks of the river, formed with millions of cockle shells from when the Butchulla people searched for their food.

Stone tools, graves and significant indigenous medicine trees are scattered across Mr Waters' residential paradise.

Doug Waters property on the banks of the Burrum River near Burrum Heads - rocks used by indigenous inhabitants as axes. Photo: Alistair Brightman / Fraser Coast Chronicle
Doug Waters property on the banks of the Burrum River near Burrum Heads - rocks used by indigenous inhabitants as axes. Photo: Alistair Brightman / Fraser Coast Chronicle Alistair Brightman

In 2016 the only noise on the river is the loud discussions between fishermen in their boats off the banks.

Mr Miller said the abundance of food sources would have once made Mr Waters' property a popular meeting point for the Butchulla people.

"A lot of people camped here and harvested food here, and done it for a long time," he said.

"This was a pretty popular sport because there was a lot of food here.

"This was like camping behind a supermarket."

Mr Miller is the president of the newly formed group, Butchulla Men's Business Aboriginal Association.

"Our plan is to go around and record as many sites in Butchulla country as possible," he said.

He wants part of Mr Waters' property to be put on the State Heritage Register for its indigenous significance.

Doug Waters property on the banks of the Burrum River near Burrum Heads - (R) Doug Waters talks with Lawrence Wyvill from Calm Water Culture about the bushtucker trees on the property.. Photo: Alistair Brightman / Fraser Coast Chronicle
Doug Waters property on the banks of the Burrum River near Burrum Heads - (R) Doug Waters talks with Lawrence Wyvill from Calm Water Culture about the bushtucker trees on the property.. Photo: Alistair Brightman / Fraser Coast Chronicle Alistair Brightman

Mr Waters has known about his home's history since moving there 30 years ago.

He kept its significance quiet due to the dispute about land rights between white and Aboriginal Australia in the 1980's.

"I've known ever since I've come here but everybody says you shouldn't talk about it," he said.

Mr Waters is selling his property.

"It's a paradise," he said.