Queensland's peak seafood body claims the industry is already highly regulated, after conservation groups and recreational fishermen put out a unified call to re-zone a part of the Great Sandy Marine Park.
Queensland's peak seafood body claims the industry is already highly regulated, after conservation groups and recreational fishermen put out a unified call to re-zone a part of the Great Sandy Marine Park. Warren Lynam

State's peak seafood body says industry 'highly regulated'

QUEENSLAND'S peak seafood body has slammed a call for changes to the Great Sandy Marine Park as a "poorly disguised attempt" to stop the sale of inshore fish species.

Queensland Seafood Industry Association president Keith Harris said the local fishing industry posed minimal threat to species of conservation interest.

He called on "true environmental groups" to "weed out the fakes and cashed up, overseas conservation groups with their own agendas".

"These groups are fully aware that our fisheries are the most highly regulated food production activities under both State and Federal Government environment legislation," Mr Harris said.

"More focus needs to be directed to issues such as water quality, coastal development, the impacts of increased recreational fishing along the Queensland coast and their impacts in marine parks.

"Politically motivated calls for less net fishing will lead to less local seafood available for Queenslanders, interstate tourists and international visitors."

Mr Harris said the State Government needed to stop focussing on the conservation groups.

He said the government should instead direct its attention to "policies that support Queensland commercial fishing and the associated businesses that help provide fresh local seafood".

Hervey Bay MP Ted Sorensen said the issue was "not about the commercial or recreational fishing industry" but instead the "ALP and Green alliance, and them turning everything into a green zone, and no one will be able to throw a line in".