HERVEY BAY 100: (L) Manager of the Beach House Hotel Paul Robins. Photo: Stuart Fast (R) Competitor Janelle Harding during the bike race in 2019. Photo: File/ Cody Fox
HERVEY BAY 100: (L) Manager of the Beach House Hotel Paul Robins. Photo: Stuart Fast (R) Competitor Janelle Harding during the bike race in 2019. Photo: File/ Cody Fox

Triathlon proves there’s no holding the Fraser Coast back

THE COVID-19 pandemic has hit the hospitality and accommodation industries hard and that is why big events like the Hervey Bay 100 triathlon are a godsend for these industries.

For manager of the Beach House Hotel Paul Robins, having the hotel as a major sponsor of the event for the third year in a row was fantastic.

"A lot of businesses have been shut down and now reopened and this event is a way of bring people to town," he said.

"It is good for the local economy."

Mr Robins said the carnival-like atmosphere and physical nature of the event was good for people's mental health during a time of crisis.

For Hervey Bay hotel Eden by the Bay, the triathlon brought regular business in an otherwise turbulent year.

 

Staff from Eden By The Bay looking foward to the Hervey Bay 100 and the business it brings. Photo: Contributed / Sandy Boles
Staff from Eden By The Bay looking foward to the Hervey Bay 100 and the business it brings. Photo: Contributed / Sandy Boles

 

Hotel manager Jeanette Maynes said they had been booked out for the event.

 

"We have a full house and have done so every year since the event has been on," she said.

"We are situated at the start line where all the action is and our ocean view units are in prime position."

She said having Queensland's internal travel open meant competitors from across the state could travel to the region for the triathlon.

Ms Maynes said having events like the Hervey Bay 100 injected valuable business and money back into the community and made the town more alive.

"All our guests book in straight away for the next year's event," she said.