FIGHTING BACK: Deadly Choices officers Will Elliott and Rose Robe at the anti-smoking stand outside the Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care centre in Hervey Bay on World No Tobacco Day.
FIGHTING BACK: Deadly Choices officers Will Elliott and Rose Robe at the anti-smoking stand outside the Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care centre in Hervey Bay on World No Tobacco Day. Alistair Brightman

Two disgusting jars enough to make you rethink cigarettes

TWO jars filled with tar and flem revealed all one needs to know about the health impacts of smoking.

But 14 per cent of Australia's non-Indigenous community, along with 46 per cent of the Indigenous community, are still lighting up cigarettes, addicted to the chemicals that could bring their lives to a premature end.

Galangoor Duwalami Primary Health Care Service yesterday held stalls in Maryborough and Hervey Bay to educate the community about the dangers of smoking on World No Tobacco Day.

Will Elliott from Deadly Choices was encouraging people to stop and take the smoking survey and make the pledge to keep their homes and cars smoke-free.

He said that pledge was important when it came to providing a smoke-free environment for children.

"It goes into curtains and the couch and even the wall," Mr Elliott

The team was giving away free merchandise to connect with the community and share their message, as well as helping people connect with the Quitline.

The jars contained a year's worth of flem and tar, while other props showed the difference between a healthy lung compared to the same organ ravaged by emphysema.

Other props showed the toxic chemicals in cigarettes, including rat poison and the amount of plaque accumulating in the arteries of the average smoker.

Mr Elliott said the day gave himself and the other volunteers the chance to connect with people and give them the chance to make a change for their health.

"We're making people re-think their choices," he said.

"We're educating people and giving people information and helping them connect with services."

Mr Elliott said the hardest part of the fight against the use of tobacco products was hearing of the slow, painful deaths some people had suffered as a result of diseases caused by smoking.