Spyke Clarke, left, and Kaylee Sleath, right, from Year 3 with teacher's aide Jodie Burns learning Butchulla language.
Spyke Clarke, left, and Kaylee Sleath, right, from Year 3 with teacher's aide Jodie Burns learning Butchulla language. Alistair Brightman

Urangan students have fun learning about Indigenous culture

FROM throwing boomerangs to learning the Butchulla language, the children at Urangan State School got a taste of Indigenous culture during the NAIDOC Week activities.

Teacher's aide Jodie Burns said the kids loved taking part in the events each year.

"They take part in all the activities and learn a bit of Butchulla language too," she said.

"The kids love it."

Ms Burns said it was great to see the children learning about Indigenous culture.

"I'm very passionate when it comes to our culture," said Ms Burns, who has worked at the school for 11 years.

For Aboriginal children, it was an additional chance to connect with their culture and background, she said.

The range of activities was wide, from art to sport, traditional games, story-telling and music.

Ms Burns said the school did the activities every year, with the children rotating through the various events throughout the day.

An eight-week program called Little Rangers will start soon, with lessons every week from the Butchulla Aboriginal Corporation.

It will include teaching students how to be dingo safe.

Ms Burns' brothers are rangers working on Fraser Island and she can't wait for the program to begin.

Butchulla elder Joyce Smith was at the school for the flag raising ceremony during the week.

It was a special moment for the 88-year-old - she started at Urangan Point State School when she was five years old.

She still loves hearing the Dreamtime story about the creation of K'gari, to which the students were also treated.

"I love to come back here," she said.