Angela Banovic pleaded guilty in Warwick Magistrates Court today to one count of trespass after chaining herself to machinery at Carey Bros Abattoir in April.
Angela Banovic pleaded guilty in Warwick Magistrates Court today to one count of trespass after chaining herself to machinery at Carey Bros Abattoir in April. Elyse Wurm

Vegan ordered to pay back abattoir after protest

A VEGAN activist convicted over the protests at Carey's Yangan abattoir last month has been forced to repay part of thousands of dollars lost by the business as a result of the incident.

Police say the 17 people charged should share the $3000 lost by the abattoir, if convicted.

Angela Banovic, 37, pleaded guilty to one count of trespass and was the first to front court in Warwick over the protests.

She told the court this morning she felt staging the protest was the only way for the activists' message to be heard.

Banovic, who has 14 years' experience working as a senior executive officer and now works for the Queensland Government, admitted to chaining herself to machinery.

"I wanted to draw attention to the inherent cruelty of the animal agriculture industry and ask for transparency so consumers can make informed choices," she said.

The Gold Coast woman said she acted out of desperation, but apologised for breaking the law.

 

About 20 anti-met activities from Aussie Farms broke into the Carey Brother Abattoir at Yangan this morning shortly before 4am. They stayed there until the operator agreed to free three sheep. No one has been charged or fined by police.
Anti-meat activists entered Carey Bros Abattoir in April. Michael Nolan

Alongside a fine, police prosecutor Ken Wiggan said the company, known as Ballyhigh Pty Ltd but trading as Carey Bros Abattoir, wanted $3000 in restitution after 20 staff and the business owner had to be paid hours of overtime following the protest.

With 17 people charged after the incident, Sgt Wiggan said police were asking each convicted defendant to pay $180 to contribute to the restitution.

Acting Magistrate Robert Walker ordered Banovic to pay the $180 as well as a $500 fine.

Her conviction was not recorded.

Mr Walker said there was a bevy of lawful ways to have views heard.

"Unlawfully entering a premises of a legitimately operating business and causing losses to that business is an unacceptable method and an unlawful method," he said.