Bureau of Meteorology junior meteorologist says this weekend is looking like perfect wind conditions for fishing.
Bureau of Meteorology junior meteorologist says this weekend is looking like perfect wind conditions for fishing.

What the weekend weather holds for keen fishers

While the past week hasn’t been ideal fishing conditions, the Bureau of Meteorology’s junior metrologist James Pescott says this weekend was looking up.

Saturday morning is looking to be the sunniest part of the weekend and winds are predicted to start off northerly about 10 knots.

“They’re expected to pick up again to about 15 knots from the north east into the evening,” Mr Pescott said.

Temperature is to stay in the low 30Cs and cool down on Sunday with a bit of a south easterly change moving up the coast unlikely to affect the Fraser Coast drastically.

On Sunday winds will hit around the 10 knot mark in the afternoon with a maximum temperature of 30C.

Out on the water there’s a chance of a thunderstorm on Saturday afternoon and again on Sunday inland of Fraser Island.

Mr Pescott said it’s a low risk but something to still look out for if you’re hading out on the boat, but otherwise the forecast presents pretty good fishing conditions for the weekend around Fraser Island.

According to Fisho’s Tackleworld Hervey Bay’s weekly fishing report from January 14, offshore trips look promising, predicting the “fish-rich” waters north and east of the island to be popular.

“Crossing the Breaksea Spit and bottom bashing for reefies over the shoals and the fringe of the continental shelf should see a good mixed bag,” they wrote.

They said reef fishers would likely head for the northern waters of Hervey Bay during the next week with good fish to be caught up that way, but warned that sharks are a major hassle in that area.

The deeper reefs in the local shipping channels should also fish well for a grass sweetlip, cod and the odd coral trout.

They also reported mangrove jacks in the Burrum will become increasingly active with the warmer weather and light winds, and the Mary and Susan Rivers are hoped to continue providing a “modest number” of threadfin salmon “to those live baiting or working the drains during the ebb tide”.