Josh and Tanya share their first dance at their August 8, 2020 wedding. It was the first night time wedding Waterfront Restaurant hosted since COVID-19 restrictions came into place.
Josh and Tanya share their first dance at their August 8, 2020 wedding. It was the first night time wedding Waterfront Restaurant hosted since COVID-19 restrictions came into place. Contributed

Why weddings can still be magical despite weird rules

THERE’S hardly any dancing allowed and the classic cake cutting moment is only for show, but weddings in the time of COVID can still be magical.

This is the message from Natalie Stone, Waterfront Restaurant’s weddings and functions manager.

Ms Stone said, off the back of the venue’s first night time wedding since COVID-19 restrictions were introduced, she was confident couple could still have a perfect evening.

“The couple was ecstatic,” she said.

Planning for Josh and Tanya’s August 8 wedding was different to the usual lavish events Waterfront is known for hosting.

Ms Stone said she and the couple had to come up with a plan for serving food and drinks, as well as ways of keeping guests entertained.

Under current restrictions, there is no sharing of food and no bar service.

This means all food and drinks must be served to the table.

It also means the wedding cake cannot be served if it has been displayed in the open or cut by anyone other than kitchen staff, including the couple.

Natalie Stone, weddings and functions manager from Waterfront Restaurant, Hervey Bay.
Natalie Stone, weddings and functions manager from Waterfront Restaurant, Hervey Bay.

To make sure stunning wedding cakes still get their moment of glory, the Waterfront team has introduced a protective dome, in which cakes can be displayed.

Couples are encouraged to pose for photos while pretending to cut the cake if they still want that iconic wedding moment.

Another restriction is there is no dancing allowed, apart from the bridal waltz and dances with parents.

Guests are also not allowed to leave their assigned seats and mingle.

This can detract from the party atmosphere of a night time wedding, Ms Stone said, but she has creatively risen to the challenge.

She introduced a series of table games at the weekend’s wedding, including trivia challenges.

Guests also danced the Nutbush in their seats as part of the games, she said.

Queensland’s border closure to NSW, Victoria and ACT residents is an ongoing struggle for the wedding industry.

Ms Stone said the majority of couples had postponed weddings when the first wave of restrictions was introduced.

Now, people had been ready to go ahead, only to find loved ones could not travel for the event.

Things are uncertain for one couple Ms Stone is currently working with as the groom’s best man and groomsmen all live in Victoria or NSW.

Despite all the challenges, Ms Stone said, with a few changes and plenty of planning, couples could still have the day of their dreams.